New Bakery Items

Happy Spring Everyone! 
I am so excited for some actual Spring weather to come, but I’m even more excited that we have some amazing NEW items in our bakery that I want to introduce! Drum roll please… 

Cinnamon Buttercream Pull-A-Parts – Our famous cinnamon roll recipe, shaped into a pull-a-part sequence of 8 parts. They are lightly sprayed with apricot glaze to give it a shiny look, topped with our buttercream icing then delicately placed with pecan pieces.

Cinnamon Cream Cheese Pull-A-Parts – Our famous cinnamon roll recipe, shaped into a pull-a-part sequence of 8 parts. They are lightly sprayed with apricot glaze to give it a shiny look, topped with our cream cheese icing then delicately placed with pecan pieces.

Carmel Rolls – A rich caramel smear loaded with pecan pieces is a perfect way to top off our caramel rolls. They’ll be a new favorite at your Sunday brunch.  

Cran-Oatmeal Cookies – An alternative to the traditional oatmeal cookie, try our cran-oatmeal cookie. These cookies add a bit of color and have a slight tang from the cranberries.

Banana with White Chocolate Cookies – Not only for banana lovers. This has a whole grain taste with the delicious flavor of banana and each bite is loaded with decadent white chocolate chunks.

Sea Salt Caramel Cookies – A rich pecan shortbread cookie topped with the perfect blend of chocolate, buttery caramel and a hint of sea salt. This is a bake shoppe office favorite.

Brownie Crisp Cookies – Chocolate lovers are sure to love these brownie crispy cookies.  They’re a great addition to any dessert table when entertaining.

Kitchen Sink Cookies – Perfectly thin kitchen sink crisp cookies have the perfect crunch for people who prefer a crispy cookie. These cookies have rolled oats, chocolate chips, raisins, butterscotch chips and much more. Yum!!

Almond Crisp Cookies – These almond crispy cookies are for all the almond lovers out there! The perfect cookie to have with your morning coffee. 

Chocolate Cherry Bread – Made with dark cocoa powder, loaded with dark chocolate chunks and dark tart cherries. Add a layer of cream cheese & top with fresh cut strawberries for a sweet treat. 

Sunny Sunflower Bread – Made with sunflower flour and mixed with sunflowers. Then topped with sunflower seeds for a satisfying crunch. Tastes great for any kind of sandwich or lightly buttered and toasted in the morning.

Whole Wheat Short French Bread – A healthier, whole wheat version of our fan favorite short french bread. Goes great with Italian dishes as well as your favorite dips.

Semolina Fennel Raisin Bread – Created with 3 different flours including the semolina specific flour. This bread adds a unique flavor that will enhance any Panini.

When you’re in our stores make sure to stop by the Bakery Department and sample some of these awesome new products. Enjoy!!

Jayne,
Coborn’s, Inc. Merchandising Specialist Team Manager – Bakery & Deli
Family Friends and Food with Jayne - cobornsblog.com/jayne

Marshmallow Flowers

Marshmallow Flowers www.cobornsblog.com

Ashley M. www.cobornsblog.com

Ashley M.

Spring is one of my favorite times of the year. I love the bright colors that come with the season. It’s also a busy time of the year for most people. So here is a quick, fun project to make by yourself or with the kids for all the events that will be popping up on the calendars this season! These are great since they work for Easter, weddings, birthday parties and so much more.

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How to Ice a Cake with Roll Fondant

How to Ice a Cake with Roll Fondant

www.cobornsblog.com The art of Cakes with Amanda

Amanda

Time to get fancy! Let’s talk fondant. Get out your rolling pin and nonstick mat and prepare those arm muscles for a little work out. I’ve included a little video to see the process but let’s also discuss the process from supplies to cake.

First thing you’ll need, a few special supplies. A cake, lightly iced. When you put the fondant on top it can get a bit too squishy and create a mess if your frosting is too thick. I’m going to be covering an 8” round, double layered, cake. I used 1 lb. of fondant to cover my cake but you could use a little more to give yourself a little wiggle room when covering. You should also have a fondant smoothing tool, a paddle like looking device, and a nonstick silpat mat for rolling on. Most important you need a rolling pin. I like a big heavy rolling pin for the job. You’ll also need to sprinkle powdered sugar, I like to use a shaker for this, but you could do it by hand too. I also like to use a pizza cutter for trimming my cake. It will roll smoothly around the cake. I don’t use a knife, those I keep far away from the silpat mat. Any knicks or cuts you leave behind when using a blade will show up forever after when you roll out fondant.

Ok, now to get rolling. If you want to color your fondant go ahead and do that first, then cover it up to keep it from getting crusty. Next I base ice my cake and then keep it close as I go back to start on the fondant again.

Knead your fondant, a lot. Keep kneading until it feels silky and smooth. Your hands should warm it up and make it pliable. The more you knead it the better your fondant covering experience will go. If your fondant feels dry and stiff, keep kneading. There should be a little stretch. Once it’s warmed up you can start rolling it out.

SuppliesDust your mat with powdered sugar and place your flattened ball of fondant in the center of the mat. I usually squish it out a little into the shape I want, a circle or a square. Dust the top a little with powdered sugar then start rolling. Keep rolling and rolling. Work the fondant into the shape you want. Rotate your pin, rotate the fondant. If it gets too oval or rectangular don’t be afraid to stretch back into the shape you want with your hands. Covering your cake will be easier if you can keep your fondant in a shape relatively similar to your cake. Keep checking the thickness. Give a little more muscle to the parts that are thicker. It can be tempting to use a thick a slab of fondant on your cake in the excitement of covering your cake, but be patient. A thick slab isn’t going to taste good and can squish your cake down creating slouching and puckering after an hour or so. Go thin. Shoot for about ¼” or less for a typical cake, but a little on the thicker side of that for a shaped cake to allow for stretching.

Now that you are at your desired thickness and size you are ready to cover. How big should it be? The height of your cake x 2, plus the width of the top. Then add a couple inches to allow for fidgeting and fussing.

You want to do the next steps in one, uninterrupted step. Don’t answer the phone, don’t stop for a snack. The fondant is already drying and getting a skin and if you walk away it will wrinkle and tear when you try to do anything with it, then you get to start all over.

Move your iced cake over next to your fondant slab. There are many way and tricks to picking up fondant. I don’t use them. I just pick it up like a pizzeria guy. Do it quick, yet gentle, and keep the fondant moving and you shouldn’t get any tears. If you stand around thinking with it draped over your fingers, yes, it will get deformed, but why are you just standing there? Place your fondant over the cake. There should be a little moisture left in the frosting to make it stick. If you think you are going to take more than 15 minutes to roll out your fondant covering your cake wouldn’t be a bad idea.

Lay your fondant across the top, let the sides drape down. Use your hand to smooth out the fondant from the middle to the outside. Then use your smoothing tool to briskly rub the surface. Apply pressure, just enough to work out any air bubbles. Try to work from the middle to the outside to move out any bubbles. Work quickly; your sides are starting to firm up.

Now for the tricky part, the sides. You need to start smoothing the fondant to the frosting. Work in small areas, going in a circle around your cake. You Using Fondant Icingdon’t need to stick it all at once. Imagine there are horizontal lines on your cake, about an 1 or so apart, just work from the top imaginary ring down to the next. By the time you get to the bottom half you’ll need to gently tug and stretch at the fondant to avoid the folds and pleats. Keep moving, keep working at it, and keep being patient. Smooth as you go to avoid air bubbles.

Once you have your cake covered you can trim the excess off from around the bottom with your pizza cutter. Now pick up your smoother again and start rubbing all over. At this point you are trying to polish the fondant up. Rub out any ripples, move any air bubbles down and out. If you have any stubborn bubbles you can poke a small hole with a thin pin and let the air out. This will leave a hole, but sometimes it’s worth the trade off on stubborn bubbles.

Congratulations! You did it! You have a smooth fondant cake. Have fun dressing it up from this point. You can paint it, stick fondant to it, and quilt it. And don’t forget the important part, you can eat it.

Amanda
Coborn’s Cake Decorator
Sartell, MN – Pine Cone Road

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www.cobornsblog.com - The Art of Cakes with Amanda